Where are the best casinos Asia has to offer?

When travelling across the continent of Asia, there are many casinos found throughout the region. Many of them are fairly new as many nations have made increasing tourism a top goal for themselves. Of all the places in Asia, Macau is probably the best choice for casino gambling. After all, it is the top grossing country in the world in terms of gaming revenue. Some of the casino built in Macau are quite grand and should not be missed. Many of these casinos have been developed by Vegas entrepreneurs who sought to expand their influence by building sister casinos in Macau to their Vegas venues.

Photo by WhereisMacau.com
Photo by WhereisMacau.com

For instance, the Sands located in Macau is definitely a casino to visit. While it is owned by the same company who owns the Sands in Vegas, the Macau Sands was built to be much grander. When it first opened, the casino floor only measured 165,000 square feet. However, two years later this space underwent an expansion project which resulted in a total of 229,000 square feet. This seems like a natural progression, but due to the advent of successful online establishments such as Gaming Club, who can offer many games without having to purchase floor space and other expenses, it is also essential in today’s economy.

Another Vegas developer built the MGM Macau here as the sister to the MGM Grand in Vegas. As is the trend, the MGM Macau is much larger. The gaming floor is about 300,000 square feet of gaming space. When it first opened in 2007, it was known as the MGM Grand Macau. However, three years later the Grand was dropped from its name.

Photo by macau.citsmacao.com
Photo by macau.citsmacao.com

The Venetian Macau was also inspired by another Vegas Casino. The result this time is the largest casino in the world and the largest hotel in Asia. The entire resort sprawls out over 10.5 million square feet of land. The casino itself offers 550,000 square feet of casino space. For entertainment and sporting events, the Cotai Arena was also built here providing 15,000 seats for guests.

Book your stay at the Venetian Macau Resort Hotel now!

How to avoid travel scams

Tying a whistle around my wrist to ward off the con man

I have heard numerous stories over the years about how people have returned from a vacation with sour stories of stolen passport, money or expensive items. And then there are others that fall victims to con artists and willingly fall into the trap of giving it away free willing. In fact, some people have a business of scamming tourists and are pretty good at what they do. If you have watched the movie Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, you know what I am talking about.

If you want to avoid a travel scam, the first rule is to be smart and alert at all times. You are relaxed, on vacation, want to make friends, talk to strangers, so it’s easy to let your guard down. But this is when you can get into trouble! Never leave your luggage unattended, even in a taxi or a bus. If I have to go to the facilities, I look for a family or a large group that I have observed for a while, then politely ask them to watch my bag. Don’t ever hand over your passport or important documents to anyone. If they need to make a photocopy (for whatever reason) demand that you go with them.

When I went to Morocco, I was forewarned by numerous people about the famous con artists I would encounter there. I would say I managed to stay away from all but one. While on the train from Rabat to Fes, one of my girlfriends was approached by a young man who pretended to be affiliated with a tour guide company. He offered us a train station pick up, a tour of the city and return transportation, all arranged before we reached our destination. After much discussion and contemplation, we decided to not take a chance of being stranded in the Sahara! Follow your instincts at all times.

Other signs of a scam in progress are when someone approached you from nowhere, is making an extra effort to convince you, or is offering a really good deal that is hard to refuse. Scam artists will never give you (even if they promise they would) receipts, addresses or brochures that have a price on them. It would always be a verbal contract, tailor-made especially for you. When in doubt, don’t do it.

Another time, while walking down the shopping area in Hong Kong, a shopkeeper saw me admiring the high-end watched in the showcase. He asked me to come inside so he could show me his sale items. Next thing I realized, I was walking through alleys and stairs, walking into a tiny office in one of the buildings. As soon as we reached this place, I walked out without taking a look at the items. If your gut tells you something, listen to it.

Scams during shopping are the most common. You may enter a store and pay the full asking price for an item, only to realize that the person before you paid a fraction of that. Do your research by asking locals, checking in different shops and parts of town and bargaining when the culture demands. Having some knowledge of the local language and not coming across as a complete tourist also helps.