Dreams Become Reality in Bali

Sadly, most children we sponsor do not even have a comfortable bed to sleep in – but that has already started to change thanks to new donations for mattresses.

One of the things that is shockingly apparent when we visit families of sponsored children is their poor sleeping conditions. We’ve teamed up with Go Eat Give to donate 8 new mattresses to needy families in Bali.

When Go Eat Give visited us recently, they asked us what they could do to help give immediate comfort to the children we help. Of course, mattresses was right at the top of our priority list.

Kadek Mira Artana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With all sponsorship funds going to support children’s education, it is sometimes difficult to provide things that we know families need – such as mattresses.

It’s a sad fact that the majority of children we sponsor don’t even have a suitable bed to sleep on. The families that were previously struggling with school fees simply don’t have the disposable income to afford mattresses.

Mattresses are often old, falling apart or simply thin sheets that are extremely uncomfortable.

A complete set of good quality mattresses, pillows and sheets can cost over $120 – more than most families make in a single month. It really puts it into perspective how much need there is for decent quality beds.I Putu Suandika 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Go Eat Give supporters clubbed together to raise $1,000 USD – which enabled us to buy 8 top quality mattresses for the most needy families on our sponsorship program.

Meanwhile, Tsarina, who recently sponsored Novianti had also asked if she could donate a new mattress to Novianti’s family. Tsarina had been to visit Novianti with our staff and had seen their sleeping conditions first hand.

double-mattress3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our team had the pleasurable job of purchasing and delivering fully equipped mattresses to the delighted families.

We were greeted with huge beaming smiles of families that were so grateful to finally have something comfortable to sleep on. The children were especially excited with the rare gift.

The families of gone from only dreaming of new mattresses, to actually having them.

We are so pleased to be able to provide additional support for families of sponsored children. But we can only do it thanks to the support of kind donors.

I Wayan Dika Irawan 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soon we will be launching our Mattress Appeal, which aims to secure many more mattresses for the children we sponsor. Please stay tuned!

If you would like to donate a mattress, please consider giving $120, which will purchase a new mattress, pillows and sheets for a child. We will provide full receipts and photographs of where and who your mattress has been donated to.

Remember to mark your donation ‘to purchase mattress’. You can donate here.

~ By Aron Hughes at Bali Children’s Project (BCP). Aron is from UK and currently living in Bali, Indonesia, where he does marketing and public relations for BCP. 

Rescuing the Island’s Donkeys

Donkeys are not native to the island of Bonaire. They were brought here by the Spanish in the 17th century to be used as modes of transportation and for hard labor.

Today, there is not practical use for the feral donkeys. They walk around freely and unfortunately are victims of motor accidents, dehydration and hunger.

It was about time someone stepped in and took care of these friendly animals. In 1993 Dutch Nationals, Marina Melis and her husband Ed Koopman, established a donkey sanctuary on Bonaire for sick, wounded and orphaned donkeys: Donkey Sanctuary Bonaire.

donkey sanctuary

The Donkey Sanctuary Bonaire provides a sheltered, protected life to over 400 donkeys in Bonaire. It is open to tourists, schools and community members who want to know more about donkeys, have a fun day sightseeing, or want to volunteer.

Walking into the sanctuary grounds, you can see Marina or one of her volunteers addressing the needs of the residents with food, water and medical care. She was bandaging a broken leg of a 4 months old pup during my visit. The baby would be given physical therapy so he walks on 4 legs and kept in a secluded area (with a donkey doll) for few hours each day to rest.

She shows me a separate pen where mothers and foals can stay together, so they don’t feel threatened. The orphans are raised with a baby bottle, till they can eat themselves. There is also an elderly pen for the donkeys who take time to eat and might not otherwise be able to get to their food.

donkey old home

Visitors can drive through the sanctuary in their vehicle (very slowly to avoid accidents) and be greeted by hundreds of donkeys. They come to the cars, sniff your belonging, give you kisses, and rub against your door. The donkeys here are not afraid of humans as they have become accustomed to love and friendship.

donkey kisses

There is a viewing tower where one can get off and climb a few steps to get a nice look at the sanctuary grounds. With wild shrubs and barren lands, this map feel like the serenity. Bring your binoculars so you can see a sole donkey taking a nap in one of the shelters, or playing with her baby under a tree.

donkey serengeti

On the way out, visit the rescued iguanas and turtles too. The Donkey Sanctuary Bonaire is a small nonprofit that runs independently. Here are some ways to get involved:

Adopt a donkey

For US$175 per year you can adopt a donkey. You receive an adoption certificate and a photo of your donkey that, of course, continues to live with us at the sanctuary. Periodically, you will receive from us news about your donkey and you will be kept informed about our activities. We hope you will find many opportunities to visit your donkey!

Donate

From just US$ 50 per year you can become a donor and help enormously with the care of the donkeys. Direct donations toward feed, water, medicine is possible too.

volunteer at donkey sanctuary

Volunteer

The sanctuary is run entirely by volunteers and long term internship and volunteer programs are possible. Help with cleaning, feeding, management, gift shop, etc. Marina prefers a minimum 6 weeks commitment as the donkeys take some time to form human attachment.

Donkey Sanctuary Bonaire is open for visitors daily from 10.00 until 17.00 hours. Tours by car, scooter, bike, or on foot. The entrance fee is US $7 for adults. Children up to 12 years only pay US $3.50. Adopters receive free entrance for 2 persons from their family.

Twelve year old teacher goes to India

Teaching is one of my passions. My name is Manika Bhatia. I am a 12 year old girl, studying in 7th grade at North Gwinnett middle school in suburbs of Atlanta. I enjoy playing basketball, swimming, volunteering with kids, and spending time with friends and family. When I grow up, I would like to be a corporate lawyer.  But in the meantime, I am enjoying teaching.

Continue reading “Twelve year old teacher goes to India”

Why on Earth Would I Volunteer at a Shrimp Farm in Ecuador?

Several years ago, I made the decision like many others, to leave my well guided path of working my way up the ranks in a stable career, to venture off on a new journey traveling around the world and looking for alternative possibilities for earning my way in life.  I had no solid idea of where exactly I wanted to go or what I wanted to do, just that I had to start investigating the numerous opportunities that this vast world provides.

Continue reading “Why on Earth Would I Volunteer at a Shrimp Farm in Ecuador?”

Volunteer Guides in South Korea

The best way to see a place is through the eyes of the locals. Whenever possible, I avoid hop-on buses and express tours. I like to explore cities by simply walking around and getting lost. But its always best to have a local person who speaks the local language and is familiar with the streets show you around.

Continue reading “Volunteer Guides in South Korea”

Volunteering on Cumberland Island

Love history and nature? Want to take a break away from the hustle and bustle of city life? Here’s a neat opportunity! You can be a Plum Orchard Caretaker for up to 2-3 months. Cumberland Island is a 20 mile long island off the coats of Georgia and Florida. Continue reading “Volunteering on Cumberland Island”

Why I climbed Mount Kilimanjaro (Part 2)

Continued from Part 1

The flight to Tanzania was long. It began on June 19th and I finally arrived the afternoon of June 21st.  Katyann picked me up at the airport, then we got Alexa and Kelly, before heading to Moshi.  We spent the day walking around Moshi, meeting up with some other climbers, and had a fabulous meal at the Union Cafe before retiring back to our hotel for the night. Continue reading “Why I climbed Mount Kilimanjaro (Part 2)”

Tam’s cafe for the hearing impaired



Another inspirational story of voluntrourism comes from an American chef in Vietnam. Chef Robert Danhi, a former instructor at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York and author of the cookbook Southeast Asian Flavors, leads culinary tours to Vietnam and other countries in Southeast Asia. After a few visits, Robert contemplated doing more for the country that has nourished his mind, body and soul, and find a way to give back to the people of the country.  Continue reading “Tam’s cafe for the hearing impaired”