10 Financial Tips Every Gap Year Traveler Should Know

Today’s young adults are faced with many pressures that make the transition between important life stages overwhelming. From juggling a packed schedule of classes, sports and extracurricular activities in high school to graduating college with unmanageable debt and an uncertain job market, it’s no wonder more students than ever are taking a break to travel, explore and recharge during what’s called a “gap year.”

Taking a year off between high school and college or college and a first job to travel has become increasingly popular with an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 young adults doing so these days, according to the American Gap Association. If you or your child are considering a gap year during this back-to-school season, follow these financial tips to make this dream a reasonable reality.

1. Budget wisely.
Before you figure out how you’re going to fund your gap year, you need a plan and a rough budget to determine how much money you will actually need. Take into consideration living expenses, transportation, food and entertainment when working up your expenses. If your parents decided to chip in, find out how much they are willing to give toward your trip and factor this into your estimate.

2. Select a destination thoughtfully.
Certain destinations offer incredible value for young travelers on a budget, whereas others can be extremely costly and limit a student’s time away. In Thailand, for instance, you can expect to pay as little as $5 per day on food, while one meal in Australia alone will cost anywhere from $15 to $20. Details like these are incredibly important when planning your gap year and estimated budget! For more help, review PriceofTravel.com for a list of the world’s cheapest cities along with exchange rates to find a destination that fits your needs and budget.

3. Apply for a scholarship.
Most people don’t realize that financial aid opportunities are available for students looking to take some time off from school and the real world. The American Gap Association provides a list of available scholarships and grants, some of which require college credit to qualify. Even though a gap year is intended as a break from your academic track, getting some extra credit while traveling ensures you graduate on time and get the funds you need for the trip of a lifetime! You’re not limited to only one scholarship, so apply for as many as you can and begin your research early.

4. Fundraise.
Think outside the box and consider making money by fundraising. For those who are planning to volunteer during their gap year, use VolunteerForever.com to launch a fundraising campaign to share your mission and collect donations for your trip. You can also use sites like Kickstarter or GoFundMe, or go the old-fashion route by calling organizations in your area for support. Gap Year also has a great list of creative fundraising ideas.

5. Stash away cash gifts.
Once you begin thinking about taking a gap year, it’s important to start saving. Open a separate account where you can stash away cash gifts you receive for birthdays, holidays and graduation. When loved ones ask you what you want as a gift for a celebratory occasion, be honest about your desire to travel and that you’d appreciate support towards your gap year. At Tendr.com, you can create a cash registry for your trip as an alternative to a graduation or birthday gift wish list and share it with loved ones eager to help make your dream a reality.

6. Pick up a part-time gig.
If funds are low, picking up a part-time gig is one of the best ways to ensure you have enough money for your time off. Beef up your savings by working on the weekends or evenings after school. You can find babysitting gigs through BabySitterExchange.com, dog sitting and walking jobs through Rover.com, or help people run various errands like grocery shopping at TaskRabbit.com. Otherwise, scope out jobs at a nearby retail shop, grocery store or bakery where you can pick up a few shifts per week.

7. Book early.
One of the most expensive parts of traveling is airfare and timing is everything when it comes to saving money on flights. Start tracking flight prices through Yapta and check SkyScanner.com, which specializes in finding the cheapest flight anywhere in the world. Also, websites like CouponSherpa.com offer great deals on travel expenses including discounts on hotels, airfare and travel agencies. For example, you can currently score a flight as cheap as $496 from Boston to Barcelona through Vayama, an online travel agency.

8. Think outside the box for lodging.
After airfare, finding a place to live will be your second biggest expense. Luckily, lodging alternatives like couch surfing, bedroom rentals and home swapping services make it more affordable. Use CouchSurfing.com to connect with a host and score free digs! This is a great way to experience a true cultural exchange and learn about a way of life unlike your own while making friends along the way. You can also swap your apartment or home with one in your desired destination through HomeExchange.com to live like a local and save big bucks.

9. Seek out student discounts.
Whether you’re graduating high school or just finished college, your student status can help you save money when traveling. Keep your I.D. handy and always ask if there are any student discounts available before you pay. Consider picking up an International Student Identity Card (ISIC) for student discounts in over 133 countries on travel, restaurants, and attractions worldwide. Use the ISIC global app to find and view thousands of benefits worldwide plus those nearby or at a location of your choice. Even if you’re not a student but under the age of 30, pick up a Youth Travel Card for similar benefits and discounts.

10. Get a credit card with no foreign transaction fees.
Credit cards will become an important financial tool when you’re traveling, but beware of foreign transaction fees. Around 90% of credit cards charge a foreign transaction fee for purchases made outside the U.S. and these fees can add up quickly. Capital One and Discover have eliminated foreign transaction fees and they offer more levels of fraud protection, so this would be a great alternative to help you overseas.

Andrea Woroch is a money-saving expert who transforms everyday consumers into savvy shoppers by sharing smart spending tips and personal finance advice. Check out Andrea’s demo reel or visit her website at AndreaWoroch.com. You can also follow her on Twitter or Facebook for daily money tips.

10 Things I Love About Mongolia

Mongolia was one of the countries that I was fascinated to travel to, but didn’t know much about. In my imagination, I had pictured a vast barren desert with nomadic culture. Though some of that was true, I discovered a lot more in Mongolia during my one-week visit. Here are some of the most beautiful things that took me by surprise…

Lush Green Landscapes – Yes there is a big desert covering a big chunk of the country, but there are also forests with trees, and lush grasslands. The rainy summer season and the rivers help irrigate the area. In winter, most of the country is covered in snow. Note: Ulaanbaatar (UB) is the coldest capital in the world, having a January average of -20 °C (minimum reaching -45 °C).

Village in Terelj National Park/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos
Village in Terelj National Park/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos

Free Roaming Animals – During my long drives through the countryside, I saw hundreds of yaks, sheep, goat, cows, horses and camels roaming around on their own. Because Mongolia still preserves it’s nomadic culture, many families keep a herd of animals, and keep moving to different locations for better grazing access. Note: The Mongolian diet is rich in meat and animal products (such as milk, cheese, yogurt) as this is the only source of food in many areas. 

Two humped camels/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos
Two humped camels/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos

Cute Kids – The children in Mongolia have a blend of Chinese, Persian and Russian looks. They are chubby and adorable! The kids who grow up in the countryside learn survival skills at an early age. They ride horses, milk animals, collect firewood and build gers.

Family at a parade in UB/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos
Family at a parade in UB/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos

Sleeping in Gers – While I am not a big fan of camping, I enjoyed staying at the luxury ger camps – Dream Terelj Lodge and Dream Gobi Lodge. Can you imagine waking up to this view? Here I was able to experience a nomadic home which is constructed using minimum equipment (felt, poles, lattice, cloth, ties). There is a door and an opening on the roof which is uncovered to let the light in. My ger also came with a fan, heater, lights and a private attached bath. Did you know? It takes about 2 hours for a family to construct a ger and only half hour to dissemble it.

Traditional Costumes – The Mongolian national costume is a robelike garment called a deel. It is worn with a thin silk sash several yards long tightly wound around the waist. Attached to the sash are essential objects such as the eating set, tinder pouch, snuff bottle, and tobacco and pipe pouches. Female attires are adorned with ornaments and jewelry. There are different kinds of hats and boots, depending on which part of the country they belong to. Travel Tip: There is a costume parade at the opening ceremony day before the annual Naadam festival in July. This is a good opportunity to see families from all over the country dressed in the traditional clothes. Tourists are encouraged to dress up too!

Mongolian women dressed in traditional costumes/ Sucheta Rawal
Mongolian women dressed in traditional costumes/ Photo by Sucheta Rawal

Winding Back The Clock –  Mongolia’s ancient culture is well persevered at the 13th Century National Park (located 2 hours outside UB). Here visitors can eat traditional food, visit old gers where Shamans practiced religion and Chinggis Khaan’s teacher lived, learn to write in Mongolian script, and play a horse headed fiddle.

Vastness of the Gobi Desert – The Gobi desert is the coldest desert in the world and home to many important cities along the Silk Road. It is said to be high energy place, covered with fossils as old as 100,000 years. Bayanzag aka Flaming Cliffs is a location where the highest concentration of dinosaur bones and eggs have been found. Travel Tip: Travel through the vast region of Gobi can take several days as there are no roads or signs; there are few flights which can be affected by weather conditions; the region shuts down in winters; and there are not many places to stop and ask for directions! 

Flaming Cliffs/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos
Flaming Cliffs/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos

Warm Hospitality – My hosts for this trip were Voyage Unique Mongolie. Khishigjargal and her husband, Dorjpurev took us around the entire time, giving us a very personal experience showing us their country. It felt like we were on a holiday with the family. We sang songs and ate candy during long drives, and stopped to have picnics in breathtaking sceneries. No matter where we went, we experienced the same level of polite and warm hospitality. Even when language was a challenge, the employees at hotels and restaurants would make a sincere effort to address our needs the best they could.

Drinking tea at a nomad's home/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos
Drinking tea at a nomad’s home/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos

Modern Mongolian Music and Dance – The traditional Mongolian dance is bielgee, which is performed by both men and women. Rhythmic movements, fast beats and expressive gestures that represent daily life, are simply captivating. Mongolian musicians are especially talented using deep throat singing, and several local instruments, such as the horse head fiddle, drum and gong. These days, techno and rap are being integrated, creating fun modern tunes. Travel Tip: Watch a traditional concert by the band Tumen Ekh ensemble at National Recreation Center in UB.

Naadam Festival – The annual festival celebrates the ancient sports of Mongolia – horseback riding, archery and wrestling. The entire country goes on holiday while families dress up, go for picnics and cheer the contestants. The main competitions take place at the stadium in UB, but events are also spread out. One of the most fascinating aspects of the festival is to see 5-12 year old kids race horses for up to 10 kilometers. They ride solo, at very high speeds, through the countryside! The winner receives a medal, money and bragging rights.

Horseback racing at Naadam festival/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos
Horseback racing at Naadam festival/ Photo by Amanda Villa-Lobos

11 Ideas for Multi Generational Family Getaways

1. Galapagos being so close to these animals and birds thrills people of all ages. The elder members of the family can also enjoy it as its quite a light and slow paced holiday. Trips like this can be especially enticing to families who are caring for elderly members whilst on vacation.

And there are great opportunities to charter small boats for large families (10-16 people). In addition to the Galapagos, staying on an Estancia in the highlands or going to an Amazon Lodge is a great add on to the Galapagos trip and fun for the whole family. While ordinarily children may be happy at home watching songs for kids on YouTube, an experience like this will be invaluable and unforgettable.

2. Patagonia – Thrilling beauty!

Tours can be as active as possible for the adventure folks, while the family members who like a more relaxed pace, can do more cultural or soft adventure activities. Everyone then meets back up for dinner for some great food, and great wine.

3. Safari South Africa


Explore great parks where you can see the big 5 – lion, elephant, cape buffalo, rhino and leopard. Many of these parks are Malaria free, so if taking malaria medication is a concern, we can pick a safari lodge in a Malaria Free zone.

In addition, some of the concessions we work with have small properties that a family can take over, with private guides and staff just for your family. In addition, Cape Town, Victoria Falls, and the Wine Route are great additions for the whole family.

4. Costa Rica

Just about everyone would be thrilled to see a Toucan or a Macaw from their outdoor shower, or find squirrel monkeys in the trees right outside their rooms. During a small hike through a rain forest you might stumble upon a scorpion being devoured by an army of ants, and if you slow down, the adults will be thrilled to see the excitement of the kids in the group. From relaxing in the hot springs from Arenal Volcano, to walking along the sea, to dolphin watching in the Gulfo Dulce, the whole family will be happy here.

If time permits, we can plan a trip to a wildlife rescue center where you can get up close with the animals and see how these organizations are working hard to save the lives of these animals and working with communities to educate them on saving the environment.

5. Uruguay

Stay on an Estancia or at the beach.

There are activities aplenty to choose from, and they can be tailored based on the different needs for each member of the group. Try cooking classes, Stand Up Paddle Boarding, canoeing, kite surfing, and horseback riding. Or for very active families we can do a biking tour for 4-5 days.

6. Cambodia and Thailand

One of Yampu’s favorite family itineraries combines Siem Reap in Cambodia with Chiang Mai and Phuket in Thailand. Go “Tomb Raider” style to the Angkor Archaeological Park. Depending on the interests of the younger members of the group choose to tour by bike, ATV, elephant, or van. Visit a school and a history museum as well as artisans. Then off to Chiang Mai, where we offer a flight of the Gibbons, giving alms with the monks, visiting local villages, and best of all cooking lessons.

In Bangkok and in Phuket, follow in James Bond’s footsteps to the floating villages of Bangkok, a tuktuk tour to temples, then to James Bond’s Island in Phang Nga Bay (except instead of hurling across a zip line like James Bond, we will take a long boat and a kayak).

Luxurize this trip with special experiences like a VIP picnic breakfast set up just in front of Sras Srang “Pool of Ablutions,” outside of Angkor Wat, once reserved for the King and his wives. Or take a Thai cooking class where a local well-known chef shares cooking secrets in a family atmosphere.

7. Peru Educational Trip

This may be our best family trip because it has everything. The bucket list Machu Picchu, learning Spanish, lots of activities like biking, hiking, pottery, weaving, a cultural visit to a family, and rafting (not very strenuous so okay for most family members)and finally a giving back day working in a school. Remember all of our tours can be customized so if any of this does not work for any members, we can change it.

8. Cruises! Our top cruises for families:

The Amazon River in Peru or Ecuador; the Mekong River, the lifeblood of South-East Asia; Halong Bay in Vietnam; or around Cape Horn of Chile and Argentina (penguins without the expense of Antarctica).

Glide through rainforests and wonder at the wildlife of the Amazon: hundreds of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and thousands of freshwater fish. Explore the floating villages and markets of the Mekong Delta or navigate the fantastical topography of Halong Bay in Vietnam.

9. Rainforest and Snorkeling Belize

Tropical forests rich with wildlife, majestic mountains, mysterious Mayan temples, and snorkeling in the longest barrier reef in the western hemisphere await you in Belize.

Take an unforgettable cave-tubing excursion in the “River of Caves” — seven miles long, and all of it underground. Go swimming in jungle-clad rivers, canoeing or crawling through mysterious caves, observing the birds, butterflies and other wildlife.

10. Tanzania and Zanzibar

There is something about game drives, lazy afternoons at the pool, sundowners and the cell phones and wifi either not working or very slow that brings families together. This can be done at different budgets, from amazing basic tented camps to luxury camps. While the options are limitless in Africa, Tanzania offers something for every age group. However, Botswana, Zambia, and Uganda, can also be amazing, depending on the ages and interests of the family.

11. Comfortable Trekking

For families with adult kids we offer luxury trekking in many of our destinations. This is exciting because you can hike and see some fantastic scenery in the daytime and at night have a comfortable bed and a gourmet meal. Luxury options are available in Peru (enjoy a luxurious trek staying at unique Mountain Lodges as you follow paths from Cusco to Machu Picchu), Zambia, Chile, and Bhutan. Basic Options are available in Peru, Chile (trekking in Torres del Paine), Costa Rica, Tanzania (Kilimanjaro trekking), Nepal (Kathmandu valley), and Thailand.

~ Guest contribution by Yampu Tours, specializing in custom family tours around the world. Reach them at Toll-free at 888-YAMPU-01(926-7801) or info@yampu.com