The Country That Deserves More Than A Day Trip

Liechtenstein is the 6th smallest country in the world, located in the center of the Alps, between Switzerland and Austria. Whenever I mention Liechtenstein to someone, the common reactions I get are – Never heard of it, or I’ve been there on a day trip from Zurich. Honestly, I did not know much about this tiny country either, until I went there and discovered it for myself. I did not want to do a bus tour or a day trip, since that never gives you a broad insight into the country.

Downtown Vaduz

Getting There

I rented a car from Zurich and a little over an hour later, arrived in the capital of Vaduz. The drive was mostly through small farms and highway, approaching scenic mountains.

After having spent a couple of weeks in Switzerland, Vaduz didn’t look all that different. It is a Princely state though, and a very rich one too. From the city center you can see the castle perched on a hill, looking over the capital, where the royal family still resides. The Vaduz Castle looks like a 12th century medieval castle from the outside, but the inside is very opulent, fit for 21st century kings and queens. I was told the monarch occasionally opens their home to deserving citizens when they have lavish parties.

Romantic dinner at Restaurant Maree, located at Park Hotel Sonnenhof

Where to Stay

You can still get a glimpse of royalty, by booking a suite at the Park Hotel Sonnenhof, that has a direct view of the castle. A boutique family-run Relais & Chateau hotel, this is the best place to stay in Liechtenstein. Surrounded by vineyards and mountains, the hotel has 29 rooms, Turkish-inspired spa, Michelin star restaurant and a relaxing garden. You will also see pictures of celebrity guests who have stayed here, including head of states, Sting and Paulo Coelho!

Symphony of chanterelles, cream of roasted egg plant, dried tomatoes and fresh basil.

Where to Eat

Make sure to call ahead for dinner reservations (ask for a table on the terrace) at the hotel’s Restaurant Maree, as people drive from Switzerland, Austria and Germany (all 20 miles) to celebrate special occasions at what is considered the best restaurant in Liechtenstein. The restaurant has been awarded 1 Michelin star, 2 Toques and 17 points from Gault Millau – in other words, its really good! Chef Hubert (the hotel’s owner’s son) prepared a 6-course wine paired dinner for me, using a many local ingredients and the finest European wines. Highlights were chanterelle mushrooms in roasted eggplant dip, codfish with orange risotto, a light and refreshing raspberry sorbet and elderflower jello dessert, washed down with French moscato.

The cuisine in Liechtenstein is influenced by its very close neighbors and you will mostly find the same dishes as in the Swiss-German region. There are a few international restaurants in downtown Vaduz as well.

What to Drink

The Princely Winery Hofkellerei owned by the Prince of Liechtenstein is located in Vaduz. You can walk around the small vineyard (their larger one is in Austria) and spend a few hours tasting their wines in the Princely Domanie. There’s also a restaurant and a gift shop that sells wine, champagne and Princely chocolates.

Things To Do

If you went to Liechtenstein on a tour bus, you would probably be dropped in downtown Vaduz for half a day. It is a really small place with an interesting mix of architecture that doesn’t make it a pretty city. However, you can actually spend a couple of days here exploring the many museums that house the royal family’s private collections, stamp collections, as well as rotating art exhibitions. The Adventure Pass gives you access to over 30 museums and attractions around the country for only 30 Swiss Francs.

Trekking guide Berggotta Rosaria Heeb in Sareis.

For me, the best part of Liechtenstein was its hilly countryside. I drove to the villages of Malbun and Triesenberg, took a chair lift to Sareis, and walked with a local guide. There are many hiking, biking, and mountain climbing trails (download the trails app) where you can see interesting rock formations, wildflowers, and cows with bells walking around pastures. Take a break at one of the dairy farms to taste fresh yogurt, cheese and ice creams.

You can also hike with a Golden Eagle and his guide. Watch the majestic’s bird’s flying and hunting skills as Norman, the falconer (one of the only ones in the country) talking passionately about his relationship with his bird.

Norman and his Golden Eagle.

All the locals I met in Liechtenstein were very friendly and truly loved living there. The 30,000 citizens (citizenship is very difficult to get) feel happy and well taken care of by the government. When I asked them what they loved most about their country, they said – Being able to wake up to this beautiful scenery, breathe clean mountain air, be outdoors and not have to face any traffic!

Myths of Bhutan Revealed

Up until recently, when I visited the tiny country of Bhutan, it remained a mystery to me. I pictured this magical place where the entire nation practices Buddhism, animals roam free through the protected forests, and everyone is happy and content all the time. Some of the movies I watched also suggested that one becomes very peaceful and all the illnesses go away when you go to Bhutan.

As an eager journalist, I wanted to find the facts for myself. What I discovered was very different from everything I knew, which is generally what happens until you actually travel to that destination.

Here are some of my questions answered…

Is everyone in Bhutan Buddhist?

Technically, Bhutan is a Buddhist country. Majority of the population is Buddhist, followed by Hindu. Though the influence of Buddhism is strong in many areas, not 100% of the people observe all its beliefs and rituals. About 15% of the population are Buddhist monks. There are both male and female monks in the monasteries.

female monk in Bhutan

Do Bhutanese eat meat?

If you look at the traditional Bhutanese menus, they tend to have a lot of meat dishes, including pork, beef and chicken. The government does not allow killing of animals for consumption. In fact, you can get arrested and fined if you slaughter an animal for food, fish from the rivers, or even accidentally kill a stray dog. Therefore, the meat you find in Bhutan is imported, mostly from India.

Though the Buddhist belief does not allow consumption of animals, many of the Bhutanese people do eat meat.
bhutan food

Is everyone in Bhutan happy?

In 2016, the World Happiness Report published by the United Nations ranked Bhutan as the 84th happiest country. According to the domestic survey done to measure Gross National Happiness in Bhutan, 90% of the population reported that they were happy. Now the definition of happiness can be subjective. In Bhutan, you will find a lot of poverty and access to very little resources. Infrastructure is undeveloped, there is high unemployment, work is mostly in agricultural sectors, and practically everything is imported into the country. One might question, how one can be happy having so little? In fact, while walking around shops, I didn’t particularly find anyone smiling or laughing with joy. Most people went about their day very seriously and responded only when spoken to.

Perhaps the people in Bhutan are happy because of their culture which embodies the teaching of Buddhism. There is strong emphasis on living as a community, helping each other, doing good deeds and finding happiness from within.

Is there any crime in Bhutan?

Though Bhutan is a peaceful country and quite safe, there is some petty crime especially among the youth. You can find instances of pick pocketing, theft, domestic violence and an occasional murder as well. When I asked one of the judicial officials regarding this, he mentioned that most cases of crime are committed by adolescent boys, perhaps overcome by peer pressure, alcohol or just hormones. Crime in Bhutan is significantly less than other countries.

Is Bhutan a mountainous country?

Given that the country is half the size of Indiana, there is unimaginable diversity in nature. Valleys, subalpine mountains, rivers, and plains are spread through the country, making it hot and rainy in the south, and dry and cold in the north. 60% of the country is protected as forest land under a strict regulation for maintaining the environmental impact. It is home to many animals including leopards, tigers, musk deer and takin. There are also some of the highest peaks in the world found in the Himalayan mountains of Bhutan, making it a great destination for trekking and mountaineering.

punakha bhutan scenery

The highest point in Bhutan is Gangkhar Puensum at 7,570 metres (24,840 ft), which has the distinction of being the highest unclimbed mountain in the world

Can you feel the monarchial presence in Bhutan?

Bhutan’s political system has recently changed from an absolute monarchy to a constitutional monarchy. In 2005, King Jigme Singye Wangchuck transferred most of his administrative powers to the Council of Cabinet Ministers and allowed for impeachment of the King by a two-thirds majority of the National Assembly.

In everyday life, you can feel the presence of the monarch though. Pictures of the royal family, including the current 36-year old king, Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck and Queen Jetsun Pema are displayed at homes, shops, museums, hotels, etc. They make ceremonial appearances at festivals and assemblies, and give motivational speeches to the kingdom on the importance of education, giving back, and following one’s customs.

How much freedom do the Bhutanese people have?

In 1999, the government lifted a ban on television and the Internet, making Bhutan one of the last countries to introduce television. They believed that exposure to the western world makes people unhappy as it encourages desire and greed.

There are few bars and clubs in Bhutan, mostly frequented by young people. Certainly not a destination for party lovers.

happiness wine in bhutan

Traditions supersede freedom of expression. The King requires everyone to wear the national costume to work, school and temples. Only during free time, one can choose to dress as they like.

Women and men have equal rights in Bhutan. Even in jobs involving manual labor, such as construction and agriculture, you can find women working alongside men. Respect for women is also an important part of Buddhist culture. Bhutanese men perform domestic duties including cooking. Traditionally the groom moves to the bride’s family home after marriage.

people of bhutan

What shocked me most about Bhutan?

The poverty in Bhutan was very noticeable from the moment I landed in Paro. There were dirt roads right outside the airport, and lots of garbage on the streets. I guess I was expecting this enchanted land with forests and mountains, where everything is squeaky clean, and the people in a constant state of eternal bliss.

Bhutan facts

Secrets Behind Bhutan’s Happiness

The Kingdom of Bhutan is a tiny Buddhist country located between two emerging superpowers, China and India. How is it that it manages to retain its stance on measuring the country’s progress based on GNH (Gross National Happiness) vs GDP (Gross Domestic Product)? Are the people in Bhutan truly happy, and why? These are some of the questions I was eager to get answers to during my recent visit to Bhutan.

At first glance, I saw a lot of poverty, undeveloped infrastructure and lack of resources even in the country’s capital, Thimphu. There were a few hotels and restaurants, the shops were selling television sets one found in the 1980’s, cars were freely emitting exhaust, and people throwing garbage out their windows. When I walked into souvenir shops, I wasn’t greeted or welcomed, and attended to only when I asked something. On the streets, people had serious faces and went about their daily business. From an outsider perspective, I would say these were not signs of happy people.

people of bhutanHowever, when I had one-on-one conversations with people and asked them about the meaning of happiness, they gave me a refreshing response. The Bhutanese people grow up in a Buddhist lifestyle. They pray everyday, believe in karma (which includes doing good, not harming animals, taking care of the environment), and furthering their lives collectively. They live as a community and everyone comes forward to help each other in times of need, be it death, birth or illness. There is a strong sense of culture which is reflected through their lifestyle, costumes, and celebration of festivals.

bhutan prayers

I also interviewed Mr. Saamdhu Chetri, executive director at Gross National Happiness Centre. He told me that the idea of GNH was started by the 4th king of Bhutan who studied at Cambridge and traveled extensively. The King realized that people in the western world had much too consume, but weren’t really happy. He decided to create a new framework for his own government, in which he would focus on the well being of his people and the country’s resources, rather than how much they can produce. He appointed a team of statisticians, psychologists and ministers to create standards of measuring happiness i.e. GNH index based on 33 questions. The index surveys all citizens of the country on psychological wellbeing, health, education, time use, cultural diversity and resilience, good governance, community vitality, ecological diversity and resilience, and living standards. They survey does not measure income.

Saamdhu Chetri bhutan

Here are some of the results the GNH Index reveale about happy people of Bhutan:

  • Men are happier than women on average.
  • Of the nine domains, Bhutanese have the most sufficiency in health, then ecology, psychological wellbeing, and community vitality.
  • In urban areas, 50% of people are happy; in rural areas it is 37%.
  • Urban areas do better in health, living standards and education. Rural areas do better in community vitality, cultural resilience, and good governance.
  • Happiness is higher among people with a primary education or above than among those with no formal education, but higher education does not affect GNH very much.
  • The happiest people by occupation include civil servants, monks/anim, and GYT/DYT members. Interestingly, the unemployed are happier than corporate employees, housewives, farmers or the national work force.
  • Unmarried people and young people are among the happiest.
  • There is quite a lot of equality across Dzongkhags (districts), so there is not a strict ranking among them. The happiest Dzongkhags include Paro, Sarpang, Dagana, Haa, Thimphu, Gasa, Tsirang, Punakha, Zhemgang, and Chukha.
  • The least happy Dzongkhag was SamdrupJonkhar.
  • The ranking of dzongkhags by GNH differs significantly from their ranking by income per capita. Sarpang, Dagana, and even Zhemgang for example, do far better in GNH than in income.
  • In terms of numbers, the highest number of happy people live in Thimphu and Chukha – as do the highest number of unhappy people!
  • Thimphu is better in education and living standards than other Dzongkhags, but worse in community vitality.

bhutan female monkThe results are used by the kingdom and the government to make decisions regarding administrative policies, planning, resource allocation, monitoring and evaluation of development. They use the survey results to prepare strategy for the country’s development with values that includes equality, kindness, humanity, screens policies and measures sufficiency in every Bhutanese life. As a result, education is now freely available to even the remotest locations of Bhutan.

When compared to other happy countries of the world (such as Denmark, Finland), Bhutan doesn’t compare as those ranking account for economic prosperity as well. Bhutan being a small third world country, where hardly anything is manufactured or exported from, does not stand a chance.

According to my understanding, happiness is a difficult thing to measure. When you ask someone, “Are you happy?” most people respond “Yes”. It is also subjective. On the other hand, mental, physical and spiritual wellbeing are more reasonable measurements that defines if the environment hold all the factors that would enable someone to be happy. It is good to know that the basic principal of Bhutan is to govern based on the citizen’s well being and many countries are now looking towards Bhutan for advice on the same. Mr Chetri himself has been meeting with global leaders to consult them on how to implement the concept in their own countries.